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The Happy Show

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A few weeks ago I was fortunate to see Stefan Sagmeister speak for the opening of "The Happy Show", an exhibition on his personal pursuit of happiness at MOCA Pacific Design Center. I was also fortunate to arrive an hour before, because a very large long line was beginning to form. I made it into the tiny lecture hall with standing room only left, and found a comfy spot on the floor.

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It was definitely worth the long line and aisle "seat". Sagmeister talked about his new exhibition, his exploration on what makes him happy and how that can be increased. I loved his take on spreading out retirement during his working years, by taking a sabbatical every 5 years. That time off would inevitably influence his creative work the following years, keeping his work fresh and ever evolving.

About a week later, I went to the exhibit with my husband. Hand written descriptions graced the walls, explaining different theories. A gum ball machine let you participate in a survey of your level of happiness, while creating one large visual. Three different videos played, integrating typography and videography. By the time we left, I had not only increased my level of happiness, but my creativity as well. I already have plans to pop back into the exhibit before it ends in June. It was a thoroughly enjoyable way to spend an afternoon.

A majority of the copy on the wall was handwritten. And who doesn't love a giant gum ball machine!

A majority of the copy on the wall was handwritten. And who doesn't love a giant gum ball machine!

The elevator door graphic was hilarious. And the pattern on the back of that card is pretty phenomenal. I loved all the unexpected touches that integrated every aspect of the rooms—even the alarms. The bike, sadly, was broken, probably from all the riders cycling like crazy to make the neon signs light up in front of it. 

The elevator door graphic was hilarious. And the pattern on the back of that card is pretty phenomenal. I loved all the unexpected touches that integrated every aspect of the rooms—even the alarms. The bike, sadly, was broken, probably from all the riders cycling like crazy to make the neon signs light up in front of it. 

(top image source)